VISUAL SOMA

14 Jan 2008 462 views
 
supporter of
atom rss 1.0 rss 2.0
web browser google del.icio.us digg technorati
| lost password
birth date
cancel
photoblog image quarry

quarry

The view of the limestone quarry from the end of our mountain.

quarry

The view of the limestone quarry from the end of our mountain.

comments (4)

  • Harry
  • London
  • 14 Jan 2008, 11:25
It's interesting to see this because normally the collective effect of all your pictures is of some kind of untouched environment. Only superficially untouched, but you know what I mean. Even the shot of cornfields was slightly unexpected: after reading your blog for some time, I still have very little idea really of what the area near you is like, apart from the woods themselves.
Dave Bonta: "Superficially untouched" would be the way I'd put it - the mountain has been clearcut two or three times since the early 19th century - but I take your point. I have mentioned this quarry from time to time, mostly as source of noise pollution. It's a little over a mile from my house as the crow flies. Its lights destroy the night sky to the northeast, and its limestone goes to build a couple of nearby highways, including currently the northern extension of Interstate 99, which is right over the ridge to our west, about 3/4 of a mile away.

I blogged about the quarry here: http://www.vianegativa.us/2006/05/09/new-enterprise-stone-lime/
  • Bill
  • United States
  • 14 Jan 2008, 13:29
It's beautiful. I love quarries. Look at the nearly vertical bedding in the stripped earth. I can have such warm feelings for a piled cone of crushed stone, rippling, soft, poured, a million deliberations made as whether to roll further down the slope or to lay in repose, peaceful in the aftermath of such a violent creation. What a melange your bedded stone is. I love that limestone is really animal, not really mineral at all. Like the hair of a deer, it was once alive and possibly has a memory of life. I am fascinated that the creepiness of the dead comes not from having died, but from having once been alive. I am interested in the fuzzy boundary between organic and inorganic. If limestone or marble is a slabbed outcrop of the dead, then even quartz might be culpable, might have a moral dimension.
Dave Bonta: Bill, you make many interesting points, and I too like rock cuts, but I don't share your fondness for quarries in general. This one used to be a small, family-owned quarry, but then it got bought up and expanded hugely, eating away at valuable farmland and making life miserable for the couple hundred people who live within a quarter mile of it. I must admit, though, it would be much harder for us to live up here if we didn't have such a convenient source of stone for our mile-and-a-half-long gravel driveway.
  • sylph
  • Great Britain (UK)
  • 17 Jan 2008, 20:06
this looks painful like a wound
Dave Bonta: A wound with beautiful lighting, though, don't you think? Like some gory saint's relic in a gilded case.
  • sylph
  • central Pa.
  • 23 Jan 2008, 21:35
this is really wonderful, looks like dawn and the machines, run by robots, have been digging and dumping all night...the steam rising from material just brought to the surface in the last hour from a deep dark place.
Dave Bonta: Thanks for providing two totally different reactions for me to choose from!

Leave a comment

must fill in
[stop comment form]
show
for this photo I'm in a any and all comments icon ShMood©
camera FinePix S5200
exposure mode shutter priority
shutterspeed 1/480s
aperture f/7.1
sensitivity ISO200
focal length 21.6mm
reading lightreading light
wheelwheel
temple of corntemple of corn

Warning